Death expectancy? For studying health inequality?

What’s the opposite of life expectancy? Well I think it might be death expectancy, the area above, rather than below, the survival curve. Say we have a lifetable where the last age is 110+. There are essentially 111 years of life in the lifetable. So death expectancy at birth is 111 minus life expectancy. I am sure you could derive this directly from lifetable elements and demographers have this sorted already. Let me know. Also note I took inspiration from this paper that looked at 100 minus life expectancy.

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The link between population health and health inequality

Is life expectancy increasing? Is health inequality decreasing? These are fundamental questions for population health.  It is thus natural to ask if life expectancy and inequality are related. The figure below shows they are. It compares life expectancy – average age at death – to the distribution of the age at death around this average (inequality). If everyone died at the same age there would be no inequality. So average years of life lost per death measures inequality. Higher life expectancy is associated with lower inequality.  Each dot is calculated from 5 years worth of data for a country, with 41 countries observed since 1950 (i.e. one dot is for Scotland in 1950-54).

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